Social Media in Libraries: An Interview with the Social Media Managers at the Morgan Library and Museum

by Stella Sigal, MSLIS Candidate and Themis Brown Reading Room Intern at the Morgan Library and Museum

“If it can’t be found on the Internet, it doesn’t exist.” As we move into the Twenty-First century, industries have transitioned to a social media platform to promote their products. With a click of a button, users can easily access information. Traditional cultural institutions, such as the Morgan Library and Museum, have embraced this revolution. Online social media platforms offer institutions an unusual opportunity to interact with patrons outside their physical walls. This facilitates educational dialogue and offers institutions a chance to showcase their programming to a larger audience.

The Morgan’s social media managers, Moriah Shtull and Michelle Perlin, offer their thoughts on promoting the library’s collections and educational programs and its transition to social media.

Q: The Morgan Library and Museum has made its transition to social media. What are some of the benefits?

A: The mission of the Morgan is “to preserve, build, study, present, and interpret a collection of extraordinary quality, in order to stimulate enjoyment, excite the imagination, advance learning, and nurture creativity,” and social media presents an unparalleled opportunity for outreach to a global audience. Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Transitioning from One Library into Another

A Conversation with DaTransitions Word Cloudvis Erin Anderson and Raymond Pun

Davis Erin Anderson and Raymond Pun are co-editors of the upcoming volume titled Career Transitions for Librarians: Proven Strategies for Moving to Another Type of Library to be published by Rowman and Littlefield in 2016. This conversation piece explores how they both decided to work on this edited volume that is focused on library career transitions. They will also share some insights they found in the chapters that were submitted for this volume.

Davis:
Hello Ray! Thanks for conversing with me regarding our project to edit and publish a book featuring stories from librarians who are making transitions within the field. I remember when you and I met for coffee in June 2014 to talk about partnering on this project. How did you conceive of this project in the first place? We know from our publishers that a book of this nature hasn’t been produced before; how did the idea come to you? Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Letter from the Editors

Fall Foliage by fabfotofx licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0

Fall Foliage by fabfotofx licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0

Dear Reader,

Welcome to the Transitions issue of Bridge to Excellence (B2E). In this issue we encounter individuals, organizations, and professions in transition as they face the challenges and opportunities that accompany all change.

Davis Erin Anderson and Raymond Pun chat about how they both decided work on editing an upcoming volume tentatively entitled Career Transitions for Librarians: Getting A Job in Another Library. (It is to be published by Rowman and Littlefield in 2016.) Thanks, Davis and Raymond, for inspiring the theme of this issue of B2E!

Stella Sigal interviews Morgan Library and Museum social media managers Moriah Shtull and Michelle Perlin about how this classic institution has bridged the transition into a new era for library outreach by connecting with people around the world via Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and other platforms.

Elizabeth Willse takes us through a year of career and personal transitions as she networks her way from library student to academic librarian and author of Using Tablets and Apps in Libraries.

Rina Krautwirth, a 2014 Ellis Mount Scholarship winner, shares her experiences learning about medical libraries’ transition into the world of new technology during her thesis project at Queens College.

Finally, we are introducing what will be a regular column, “Words from Outside SLA New York,” featuring an SLA member from another part of the country or world. Marcy Winkler and the 2015 SLA NY Board wrote in an open letter that local chapters serve as laboratories for innovation, and we want to learn from our colleagues in other regions.

This issue, Carrie Wardzinski from SLA Pittsburgh takes us on a historical journey through her chapter’s long history of succeeding despite economic downturns, changes in technology, and even war. She discusses how we can all learn and take inspiration from that history during our current transition as an organization and profession.

To welcome Emma Davidson as SLA NY’s incoming president for 2016, B2E is proud to announce that our next issue will match her theme for the year: “The Future is a Moving Target.” We’ll leave it to Emma to explain what this means to her in the upcoming issue, but this is what it means to us as the editors of B2E: Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Transitioning Technology in Today’s Medical Library

By Rina Krautwirth

Research Project on Medical Libraries

Photo by NEC Corporation of America with Creative Commons license.

Photo by NEC Corporation of America with Creative Commons license.

For my thesis project at the Graduate School for Library and Information Studies (GSLIS) at Queens College during a required course titled Research in Library and Information Studies, I chose to research and study medical libraries and librarianship in order to learn more about how a modern-day medical library operates. In particular, I looked at how a medical library utilizes emerging technology, a phenomenon currently progressing rapidly, and gained valuable insight into best practices for medical libraries. Moreover, I saw how a medical library can serve as a vital resource and pillar of support for its surrounding community. I also learned of the current challenges faced by medical libraries and librarians. These challenges stem to some degree from the recent rapid growth in the field of technology and from the vast amount of medical research taking place, two positive contributions to society that at the same time require adaptations and accommodations for their successful implementation. As librarianship continues into the twenty-first century, medical librarians continue to work to meet new challenges and to bring about improvements in medical and scientific knowledge.

Synopsis of Findings from Research Project Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail
Blog

SLA New York is delighted to announce the winners of the 2015 Chapter Awards! 

Please join us in celebrating our winners at the awards ceremony on Tuesday November 10th – register now at http://newyork.sla.org/events-2/event-registration/?ee=207

Committee Member of the Year
Daniel Barron

Edge Award
We Need Diverse Books

President’s Award
Kara Masciangelo
Eileen Rourke

Outstanding Achievement Award
Vida Cohen
Sarah Davis
Rebecca Hahn

Ellis Mount Scholarship
Hannah Sistrunk

Congratulations to all our winners!

We will be announcing the Dana Gordon Librarian of the Year at the awards ceremony, so you’ll have to be there to find out who won the Chapter’s highest honor this year!

I would also like to recognize our many unsung heroes – as ever, so many Chapter members have put in a huge amount of time and effort to create an excellent series of events and programs throughout the year. We couldn’t achieve any of this without you, and we are so grateful for all that you do.

Sincerest thanks are also due to our valued business partner Leadership Directories, for their generous sponsorship of this year’s awards.

I look forward to seeing you on November 10th!

Best wishes,
Emma

——————————————-
Emma Davidson
SLA NY President-Elect

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail
Blog

Call for submissions for Issue 7 – Transitions

As fall approaches and the leaves begin to change, we welcome the next B2E on the theme of Transitions.

You may choose to share a topical article, personal reflection, book or event review, photo, graphic, or whatever inspires you on the subject of change and transition within the field of special librarianship.

A broad range of viewpoints – students, new and seasoned professionals, retirees, business partners, and all others are welcome.

Possible topics include, but are in no way limited to:

  • A time you recognized that you needed a change, such as a shift in academic or professional focus.
  • Transitioning between careers or from MLS student to professional librarian.
  • Changes within the profession, for example the effects of social media on information sharing.
  • Choosing to make a change versus having one happen to you.
  • Methods to adjust to a transition or to help others through.

Ready to join in? Pitch your idea to the Editorial Board at slanyb2e@gmail.com by Monday September 21, 2015.

We look forward to hearing from you soon.

Sincerely,

Daniel Barron
Sheryl Ramer Gesoff
Helen Sobolik 
Co-Editors, Bridge to Excellence (B2E)
SLA NY

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Letter from the Editors

Dear Reader,

Welcome to the conference issue of Bridge to Excellence (B2E). Prepare to join our contributors as they discover the vitality of the conference experience at the regional, national, and international level.

Raymond Pun takes us through his journey from Shanghai to Boston to receive an award and present a poster at the Special Libraries Association annual conference (SLA Boston), his first as a special librarian coming from a public library background.

Madalyn Baron shares her experience as a past in-person attendee enjoying the conference remotely for the first time and provides tips for you to do the same.

Sheryl Ramer Gesoff brings us in to the close-knit and supportive worlds of local chapters as they come together in Boston.

Daniel Barron interviews Sarah Davis, Vida Cohen, and Rebecca Hahn on their experience organizing SLA New York’s Conference and Expo, coming up on September 25th at Baruch College in New York City.

Enjoy a sneak peek at Zena Applebaum’s SLA NY Conference and Expo keynote on competitive intelligence for information professionals.

This year the SLA New York Chapter provided scholarships to several Pratt University graduate students to help fund their attendance at SLA Boston. Bridge to Excellence is proud to present reflections from two of these students on their experience attending conference for the first time:

Megan De Armond explores user experience from a background of arts and archives.

Coral Salomón discovers digital tools to enhance user engagement with information. Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

A First Timer at SLA Annual 2015: An Academic Librarian’s Perspective

By Raymond Pun

Wendy Davis from the USDA discusses Taking the Library to the World

Wendy Davis from the USDA discusses Taking the Library to the World

This year I was able to attend the SLA conference held in Boston, Massachusetts. It was an exciting opportunity because it was also my first time attending an SLA conference. In my library career, I’ve only attended ALA conferences and they were often overwhelming. In this reflection piece, I’ll share my thoughts about SLA and ALA and some of the highlights of SLA conference for me.

I was definitely looking forward to attending the SLA conference for a few reasons: Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

SLA Boston from Afar

By Madalyn Baron

Boston 2015

In my short time as an information professional, conferences and other professional development events have played a major role in the evolution of my career. As a recent MLS graduate, SLA Annual 2013 in San Diego truly welcomed me to the profession. The experience gave me confidence and convinced me to remain active in SLA and become more involved in professional groups such as METRO and my college alumni association. SLA 2014 in Vancouver enhanced my earlier experiences by allowing me to integrate what I learned directly into my specific job responsibilities. SLA NY’s conference in 2014 and METRO’s this past January facilitated improvements in my social media efforts on the job and improved the visuals in my deliverables. I was introduced to people with similar niche interests, who I would later collaborate with for brainstorming, problem solving, and presentations.

This year I was unable to attend SLA in Boston, yet I was pleasantly surprised at the number of valuable takeaways that I benefitted from at a distance. Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail
Blog

Spotlight on SLA NY 2015 Conference & Expo Keynote Speaker Zena Applebaum

SLA NY Conference & Expo

SLA New York is pleased to have Zena Applebaum as keynote speaker for the 2015 Conference & Expo. Her keynote will arm us with new tools and perspectives on “Using Competitive Intelligence to Transform the Role of Information Professionals”. As the Director of Competitive Intelligence at Bennett Jones LLP in Toronto and a much sought writer and speaker on the topic, Zena brings a unique perspective to intelligence and market dynamics as a result of her experience in business development, data management, marketing, and corporate research.

Zena will provide attendees with a view of how Competitive Intelligence can be used by a wide variety of organizations from financial services to legal, advertising to foundations, media to medical, and beyond — in fact, into all the areas represented in the NY SLA membership. Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

How strong local chapters benefit individuals, the chapters, and the entire organization

By Sheryl Ramer Gesoff

“Some of my best friends are members of the Special Libraries Association. @SLAhq @RockyMtnSLA @SLANewEngland

–Maria Hugger (@shinydoom) on Twitter, identifying her friends in the local chapters, as well as the organization

*********

This tweet makes sense, intuitively. Professional and personal relationships are formed at lunches, happy hours, book clubs, and board meetings organized by local chapters. These encounters happen repeatedly and naturally, and strangers turn into acquaintances, friends, and even co-workers.

What roles do local chapters play? Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Exploring Arts, Archives, and Special Libraries at SLA Boston 2015

By Megan De Armond

Image courtesy SLA B&F

Image courtesy SLA B&F

I started library school in the fall of 2014 thinking I might want to be an archivist, but not certain about which area I wanted to focus on. I attended SLA student chapter meetings at Pratt Institute (SLA@Pratt) and was inspired by then chapter President Sarah Davis’s enthusiasm about the organization and all it had to offer at the student, local chapter and national level. I joined SLA in January of this year prior to attending SLA NY’s Student Swing, which ended up leading to an internship at the American Museum of Natural History. In April of this year, during one of the student chapter meetings, Sarah talked about her great experience at the 2014 SLA conference in Vancouver and the connections she made and the sessions she enjoyed. She highly encouraged all of us at the meeting to go. I registered a few days later. I was eager to experience a library conference, but also skeptical about how fulfilling it might be. I had never attended a library conference, though I had attended other conferences.

I have found that librarians are generous with information and their time, and willing to offer suggestions and share ideas with anyone who asks. I’m beginning to believe this is a characteristic of the profession. At the SLA conference, I found the environment overall to be supportive; it seemed evident that the attendees wanted each other to succeed. Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

SLA Boston 2015: Lessons and Observations from a First-Time Attendee

By Coral Salomón

Image courtesy SLA B&F

Image courtesy SLA B&F

I had the opportunity to attend my first professional conference this summer at the SLA 2015 Annual Conference in Boston. I am a Library and Information Science student interested in the digital humanities and how they fit within special libraries and archives. I am also interested in how digital applications can be used to maximize engagement and further the mission of libraries and cultural heritage institutions. I attended the conference because I wanted to learn more about the type of tools available to librarians, hear practical advice from professionals, and learn about exciting initiatives occurring in knowledge organization institutions across the country.

Below are several lessons and observations I was able to absorb throughout my time in Boston. Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

How to Organize a Conference

Behind the Scenes with SLA NY Conference and Expo organizers

By Daniel Barron

Sarah Davis, Vida Cohen, and Rebecca Hahn

Conference organizers Sarah Davis, Vida Cohen, and Rebecca Hahn

An annual conference may look just like the one that occurred twelve months before, but that doesn’t mean it organized itself. An outfit like the Special Libraries Association New York Chapter (SLA NY) relies exclusively on volunteers, and the amount of work that goes on behind the scenes at an event like the SLA New York Conference & Expo often means that a fresh group of planners is needed every year.

All three of this year’s principle organizers—Rebecca Hahn (research assistant at the Institute for Agean Prehistory), Sarah Davis (information and research coordinator at Redeemer City to City) and Vida Cohen (independent consultant and long-time SLA NY contributor)—were volunteers at the 2014 conference and were recruited by last year’s organizers, current SLA NY President Marcy Winker and President-Elect Emma Davidson, to run the 2015 event. Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail
Blog

A busy week for SLA NY

By Helen Sobolik

This past week SLA New York hosted Dee Magnoni, Candidate for 2016 President-Elect.

On Monday July 21st, Dee enjoyed site visits at Baruch College and METRO followed by a dinner with representatives of the Chapter Executive and Advisory Boards and general membership at Hudson Eats in Downtown Manhattan.

Downtown Dinner. From left: Marcy Winkler, Emma Davidson, Dee Magnoni, Daniel Barron, Helen Sobolik, Eileen Rourke, Steven Essig, Sheryl Ramer Gesoff, Rita Ormsby, Tom Nielsen, Nick Collison, and Dorothy Nelson-Gille

Downtown Dinner. From left: Marcy Winkler, Emma Davidson, Dee Magnoni, Daniel Barron, Helen Sobolik, Eileen Rourke, Steven Essig, Sheryl Ramer Gesoff, Rita Ormsby, Tom Nielsen, Nick Collison, and Dorothy Nelson-Gille

Thursday July 23, Dee joined the Chapter for The Future is Now: A Community Conversation on Value-Added Communication, Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail
Blog

Conflict First Aid: What to Do When You Don’t Know What To Do

By Pat Wagner

Conflict First AidOne of the practical principles of human behavior that I try to remember in tough times is that there are significant differences between the “right” ways to manage unhealthy conflict in the workplace and the “real” ways.

The “right” ways are what the verifiable research informs us to do because these work most of the time with most people in most situations. These include the textbook models with 47 steps and exhaustive questionnaires to probe one’s personality, techniques garnered from published theses, and ideas gleaned from the latest pop psychology books. It is important to learn how to implement these models and tactics correctly, particularly for those times when one has the time and resources to follow the rules. They often contain the foundations of principles that they can be applied in many situations. Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Building Castles in the Sand

By Emma Davidson

As a child, I never really liked playing with sand. Its lack of structure annoyed me, it irritated my skin, and of course you never knew what unpleasant surprises might be lurking below the surface. All that notwithstanding, thanks to SLA NY I’m currently adding the crenellations to the most commodious castle I’ve ever built, and I’m certainly not ready to give up my spot in the sand.

Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Being Open-Minded: A post career reflection

Leigh Hallingby

by Leigh Hallingbylhallingby@gmail.com

In September 2014, I retired from a satisfying 36-year library career which began in January 1979. I felt truly fortunate to have been employed all those years in a series of five traditional information profession positions after I finished my MLS degree at the School of Library Service at Columbia University in December 1978.  All of my jobs were with non-profit organizations. I spent the last 20 years at the Open Society Foundations (OSF), the grant-making institution of the financier and philanthropist George Soros. The Open Society Foundations was an amazing place to work in every respect, from the mission, ambiance, and quality of my co-workers, to employee benefits, opportunities for professional travel, and much more. Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Results-Based Accountability: Communication is Key

By Susan S. DiMattia

Results-Based Accountability or RBA, sometimes also referred to as Outcomes-Based Accountability or OBA, is used to improve the performance of an organization’s programs or services to produce measurable change. RBA has many connotations, but here is defined as a data-driven decision-making process to get beyond talking about problems and take action to solve them. It begins with researching and identifying desired end results then creating prioritized actions to establish the best possible means to achieve those ends. One question asked during the process is “Are the customers of your products and services better off because of the quality and efficiency of your services?” It is a “cousin” to the Return on Investment (ROI) concept and encompasses elements of advocacy. On the surface, RBA may not seem much different from the traditional methods adapted by information professionals, but if there is substance enough to create some new ways of thinking, it’s worth considering. Regardless of whether a single method or a mix of concepts is employed, a strong communication plan is key.

Success Through Sharing Techniques Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

The Colleague Connection Committee Takes a New Approach

By Emily Drew and Eric Dillalogue

 

SLA NY’s Chapter President Marcy Winkler wrote in the previous issue of B2E that one of her goals for this year “is to create an environment where all SLA NY members are open to learning from each other.” The SLA NY Colleague Connection Committee (formerly The Mentorship Committee) – consisting of Donna Severino (Chair), Zachary Leader, Linda Ronan, and the authors – has heeded that call to action as we implement new approaches to our program, making it more beneficial to all members.

Short-term, we are looking at a two-pronged approach to what we can offer our members: a new one-on-one program called The Colleague Connection and a more flexible way to connect via Power Networking. These are designed to offer new opportunities for members to connect, no matter if you are a student, just starting your career, or a veteran in the field. There is always room to learn from your colleagues and we hope to provide the structure and support to make it happen. Our long-term goals include creating an online space for connecting with members and a robust student program based on internships at local companies and institutions.

Program Launch: The Colleague Connection Continue reading

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail